You are here

News and Announcements

News and Announcements

Fighting racial discrimination in the workplace

Dec 8, 2016 / Media Coverage
The ILR School is primed to take center stage as part of a landmark class action settlement involving 450,000 African-American and Latino job seekers who sought work with the U.S. Census Bureau. According to Adam Klein ’87, lead attorney for the plaintiffs, “It’s an opportunity for the school to further its thought leadership and make a difference on a macro and U.S. economy level, to advance the interests of employees and the workplace.” Klein’s firm, Outten & Golden LLP, represented job seekers in a lawsuit against the census agency. Job applicants were rejected for the 2010 census...
Read more

Census Bureau’s $15M Hiring Bias Settlement OK’d

Sep 22, 2016 / Media Coverage
The U.S. Census Bureau will pay $15 million to a class of “hundreds of thousands” of black and Latino job seekers who claim they were shut out of jobs for the 2010 census because of a flawed criminal history screening process, under a settlement given final approval by a federal judge in New York ( Gonzalez v. Pritzker , S.D.N.Y., No. 1:10-cv-03105, settlement approved 9/20/16 ). The agreement brings renewed attention to an issue targeted by federal civil rights enforcement authorities and the Obama administration—the difficulty job applicants with criminal records can have finding work. The...
Read more

Judge approves settlement in landmark criminal records case

Sep 22, 2016 / Media Coverage
A federal court in New York approved a $15 million settlement in a case involving 400,000 African Americans and Latinos who were unable to get jobs as census takers for the 2010 census due to alleged problems with the U.S. Census Bureau's procedures involving background checks. People with arrest records, whether they were convicted of minor crimes or were arrested but not convicted, faced many bureaucratic hurdles when they applied for the jobs and were often turned away from what amounted to entry-level positions at the worst point of the recession. A disproportionate number of them were...
Read more

Outten & Golden LLP: Court Approves Landmark Settlement in Census Bureau Discrimination Class Action

Sep 21, 2016 / Press Release
A New York federal court approved the settlement of a landmark class action in which African American and Latino job applicants alleged illegal background check policies and practices at the U.S. Census Bureau denied them access to more than a million temporary jobs for the 2010 decennial census, Outten & Golden LLP and co-counsel said today. Adam Klein , the lead attorney for the plaintiffs and the head of the class action practice group at Outten & Golden LLP, said, “This historic settlement requires the Census Bureau to replace its arbitrary and racially discriminatory use of...
Read more

U.S. to Curb Queries on Criminal Histories of Government Job Seekers

Apr 29, 2016 / Media Coverage
WASHINGTON — The White House on Friday will move to bar federal agencies from asking applicants for tens of thousands of government jobs about their criminal histories until the very end of the process. While checks of criminal histories have become routine in the public and private sectors, a regulation being proposed by the Obama administration would remove a barrier that discourages many freed prisoners from applying for jobs. The rule would prevent supervisors interviewing applicants for about half of all federal positions from asking about a job seeker’s criminal or credit history until...
Read more

Census Settles Class-Action Lawsuit over Criminal History Screens

Apr 28, 2016 / Media Coverage
450,000 minority job seekers alleged race bias in background checks The U.S. Census Bureau agreed to settle a lawsuit claiming that the agency discriminated against black and Hispanic job applicants with arrest records when it conducted criminal background checks during the hiring blitz for temporary workers leading up to the 2010 census. In addition to paying $15 million to settle the suit, the Census Bureau is also required to hire industrial organizational psychologists to design new criteria for criminal background checks for the 2020 census to limit disparate impact on job applicants. Of...
Read more

Landmark $15M settlement in Census Bureau background-check lawsuit

Apr 21, 2016 / Media Coverage
Evelyn Houser, a North Philadelphia grandmother, didn't live to see the end of what she started six years ago. Houser, who died in September, was a lead plaintiff in the landmark $15 million settlement of a class-action suit this week that may help hundreds of thousands of people with criminal records get jobs. "My mom was always a determined person," said her son, Cephas Houser. "She would dig, dig, and dig, until she found something that she could fight." The U.S. Commerce Department agreed Tuesday to pay $15 million to settle the lawsuit, which involves an estimated 450,000 African...
Read more

The Census Bureau Will Pay $15 Million For Racial Discrimination After The Recession

Apr 21, 2016 / Media Coverage
In 2010, the Census Bureau rejected 450,000 black and Latino job applicants because of a flawed criminal background checking process. Now, the federal agency charged with collecting data on all U.S. citizens is paying the price — to the tune of $15 million. During the last census cycle, there were one million temporary jobs available to people hit hard by the Great Recession. But 850,000 applicants, more than half of whom were black or Latino, were denied employment because of criminal backgrounds flagged by the FBI. Applicants had 30 days to procure and file FBI documents to explain their...
Read more

U.S. Census Bureau Settles Hiring Lawsuit Over Criminal Histories

Apr 19, 2016 / Media Coverage
The U.S. Census Bureau has reached a $15 million settlement of a lawsuit claiming it discriminated against black and Hispanic job applicants with criminal histories during the 2010 census by making it too hard to document their readiness for work. Tuesday's accord was described in papers filed in Manhattan federal court, and requires a judge's approval. It requires the Census Bureau to hire two "industrial organizational" psychologists to design criminal history screening criteria for the 2020 census that limit the impact on blacks and Hispanic job applicants. About $5 million of the payout...
Read more

New application process at U.S. Census Bureau could lead to thousands more jobs for African-American, Latino applicants

Apr 19, 2016 / Media Coverage
At least tens of thousands of African-Americans and Latinos could have greater access to U.S. Census Bureau jobs under a settlement agreement to revamp the application process, according to court papers. The agreement, which still needs court approval, stems from a 2010 lawsuit brought by several African-American and Latino plaintiffs who had applied for temporary jobs with the agency — but were rejected because of inaccurate or missing FBI arrest and conviction info, their lawyers say. The suit said that old, minor offenses were used to deny some of the applicants. Roughly 450,000 African-...
Read more

Pages

Contact Us

If this lawsuit affects you, contact us for a consultation.